Saturday, 16 December 2017

Christmas Marzipan Truffles (Eggfree)


Ah! Christmastime again, delightful, dreamy, musical and hands down my favourite part of the year, there is just so much charm in setting up a Christmas tree, hanging the baubles, taking the baby's help and watching his excitement over my favorite activity. I look at his eyes full of joy, enthusiasm and wonder and rewind to when I was five, was I too this excited?, the introvert in me definitely never showed it, but even more hilarious is his grandma and her eye rolls, as if to say wasn't one Christmas enthusiast enough in this house!!!.


My favourite part about December is decorating our tree, but something I love doing even more is soaking fruits to make Christmas cake or pudding, this year however since most of our friends and family aren't in town and the baby isn't too tickled about candied peels and adult flavours, I decided to make a dessert that he loves and watching him all gleeful eyed makes it even more special, any parent would tell you that seeing their child smile is their greatest source of happiness.


Although it is believed to have originated in Persia (present-day Iran) and to have been introduced to Europe through the Turks, there is some dispute between Hungary and Italy over its origin. Marzipan became a specialty of the Baltic Sea region of Germany. The city of Lübeck has a proud tradition of marzipan manufacture (Lübecker Marzipan). The city’s manufacturers like Niederegger still guarantee their Marzipan to contain two thirds almonds by weight, which results in a juicy, bright yellow product.

Well who so ever really did invent it did a very fine job, these days however commercially produced marzipan is double the sugar to almond powder and that just doesn't do it for me, most recipes for a do it your self-er contain equal proportions of sugar and almond powder, I however have been making this confectionery in my kitchen ever since baby came along and my recipe is just a tad bit different that one usually follows.



Read on to find our how I make my marzipan dough and then dress it up to make Christmas Marzipan truffles...

To make one dozen truffles,

You will need:

Sugar - 1/2 cup
Cashew nuts - 1 cup
Almond Essence - 3 drops (optional)
Corn syrup OR Liquid glucose OR fresh orange juice - 50 ml/ 1/4 cup
Dark cooking chocolate - 125 gms
Sprinkles OR chopped nuts - to decorate


Method:

Start by powdering the sugar in a food processor or chutney grinder, remove into a large mixing bowl and set aside.

Next powder the cashews by either using the pulse button or the stop start technique at 2 second intervals to have a fine powder, twice should be enough else the cashews will let out oil.

Combine both the powders in a large bowl and add in 3 drops of almond essence if using.


Next add in the corn syrup or orange juice a teaspoon at a time, this dough goes from dry to a sticky mess in a matter of moments.


Now bring the dough together by kneading with your hands, as if you were making a dough for bread.


Once the dough comes together well without crumbling, start pinching out small portions and shape into balls.

Allow these balls to chill in the freezer for 10 mins while you ready the chocolate.



Now to temper some dark cooking chocolate, to do this finely chop the chocolate, heat half of this chocolate in a microwave safe bowl for 30 secs, remove and mix, another 20 secs remove and mix and another 10 secs.

Once the all the chocolate has melted, add in the remaining chopped chocolate, stir well till all the chocolate pieces dissolve.

Your tempered chocolate is ready (which means it won't melt at room temperature and soil your fingers)


Now drop in one prepared ball.


Roll it around well to coat evenly


Remove onto a clean dish and immediately sprinkle sugar sprinkles or nuts on top if using.

And done!

I hope you make this delicious and easy treat for your loved ones this holiday season.



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